Program | Workshops
W1: The Thirteenth International Workshop on Collaborative Editing Systems
Sun 24

Organizers:

Agustina, Nanyang Technological University
Ning Gu, Fudan University
Claudia-Lavinia Ignat, INRIA Nancy-Grand Est
Michael S. MacFadden, SOLUTE Consulting
Haifeng Shen, Flinders University
David Sun, University of California, Berkeley
Chengzheng Sun, Nanyang Technological University

Abstract:

Collaborative editing (CE) has been an area of continuous research since early days of CSCW. Various CE systems have been studied in academia as research vehicles to investigate key technical issues in building advancedcollaborative applications. In recent years, CE techniques have been increasingly adopted and further developed in industry for supporting real-world Internet/Cloud-based CE systems/services, such as Codoxware, Google Docs, IBM OpenCoWeb, Novell Vibe, and SubEthaEdit. This workshop aims to bring together CE academic researchers, industry developers, and end-users to discuss and exchange ideas on contemporary issues in researching, developing, and adopting CE systems. We have successfully organized this workshop annually at CSCW-related conferences. This year’s workshop focuses on CE issues and techniques for supporting complex real-world documents (including but not limited to rich text, xml, spreadsheet, 2D/3D digital media, CAD, video, etc.), and evaluation of CE systems for such complex real-world documents.

Participants are invited to submit a short position paper of 2-6 pages summarizing the contents of presentation, system demonstration (if any), and discussion during the workshop.

http://cooffice.ntu.edu.sg/sigce/iwces13

W2: Trust in Virtual Teams: Theory and Tools
Sun 24

Organizers:

Ban Al-Ani, University of California, Irvine
David Redmiles, University of California, Irvine
Cleidson de Souza, Federal University of Pará & Vale Institute of Technology
Rafael Prikladnicki, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul
Sabrina Marczak, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul
Filippo Lanubile, University of Bari
Fabio Calefato, University of Bari

Abstract:

The workshop on Trust in Virtual Teams provides an opportunity for in-depth discussion and community building in which trust in virtual teams will be the central theme. Virtual teams have become prevalent as the result of the interplay of several aspects which come into play during collaborative activities. While there is some progress in supporting collaborations among members of virtual teams, trust remains an aspect that bears further investigation. Trust is essential for effective and efficient collaborations to take place and is more challenging when people are unable to meet face-to-face. This workshop aims to generate discussions which address three key issues within this general theme: 1) the factors that engender and inhibit trust, 2) the structure of a trust framework, 3) and the requirements for software tools that support the development of positive trust during virtual collaborations.

To participate: Submit a 2-4 page position paper on one of the workshop themes. Submissions will be reviewed by workshop organizers. Deadline for submissions: November 2, 2012

http://collab.di.uniba.it/trusttheorytools/

W3: Beyond Formality: Informal Communication in Health Practices
Sun 24

Organizers:

Yunan Chen, University of California, Irvine
Charlotte Tang, University of British Columbia
Xiaomu Zhou, Rutgers University
Aleksandra Sarcevic, Drexel University
Soyoung Lee, University of California, Irvine

Abstract:

Despite the increasing use of formal healthcare systems such as the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and communication devices, informal communication continues to play an important role in the highly collaborative, dynamic, and information-rich medical work. Formal systems often fail to support the spontaneous and opportunistic needs of healthcare providers to communicate patient information. Yet it is not clear what constitutes informal communication in healthcare practices, what roles does it play in the patient care process, what types of technologies can be designed to support informal communication, and how to design them. This workshop aims to gather interested researchers to better understand informal communication in healthcare, to discuss their implications for CSCW healthcare research, and to brainstorm technological innovations that can support the informal aspects of health communication.

http://www.ics.uci.edu/~yunanc/cscw2013health/

W4: CrowdCamp 2013: Rapidly Iterating Crowd Ideas
Sun 24Sat 23

Organizers:

Lydia Chilton, University of Washington
Paul André, Carnegie Mellon University
Jeffrey Bigham, Univesity of Rochester
Mira Dontcheva, Adobe
Elizabeth Gerber, Northwestern University
Eric Gilbert, Georgia Tech

Abstract:

The rapidly growing field of collective intelligence – encompassing crowdsourcing, human computation, and social computing – is having a tremendous impact on the way we work, live, and play. Building on the success of a CHI 2012 CrowdCamp, this two-day event focuses on developing ideas into concrete outputs: in-depth thoughts on hard problems, paper or coded prototypes, experiment design and data mining. We will bring together researchers and industry experts to discuss future visions and make tangible headway on those visions, as well as seeding collaboration. The outputs from discussion, brainstorming, and building will persist after the workshop for attendees and the community to view.

http://crowdresearch.org/crowdcamp/

W5: Better safe than sorry: Collaboration in Safety-Critical Environments
Sat 23

Organizers:

Elina Vartiainen, ABB Corporate Research Industrial Software Systems
Kristoffer Husøy, ABB Oil, gas & petrochemicals Technology & Innovation
Clint Heyer, IT University of Copenhagen

Abstract:

Collaboration in safety-critical environment introduces special challenges for the tools in use, as the tools need to reliably support work tasks conducted in challenging situations. Examples of these types of environments include industrial settings (e.g. oil and gas platforms, mines, and factories), transportation (e.g. ships, airplanes, and trains), military settings and hospitals. People collaborating and communicating with each other in safety-critical environments might be co-located or interacting remotely, and the interaction can be simultaneous or asynchronous. Furthermore, communicated information needs to be accurate and timely. This workshop aims to bring together researchers from various backgrounds to discuss challenges and opportunities designing tools for collaboration in safety-critical environments. Such tools, when carefully designed, could bring significant improvements to personnel safety and efficiency. We also invite studies describing safety-critical environments and their needs for collaboration tools. Such information is traditionally challenging to gather because these types of environments are physically dangerous and/or difficult to access.

Interested participants are requested submit a 2 to 3 page position paper.

https://sites.google.com/site/safetycriticalenvironments/

W7: Workshop on Social Media Question Asking
Sun 24

Organizers:

Mark Ackerman, University of Michigan
Lada Adamic, University of Michigan
Nicole Ellison, University of Michigan
Darren Gergle, Northwestern University
Brent Hecht, Northwestern University
Cliff Lampe, University of Michigan
Meredith Ringel Morris, Microsoft Research
Jaime Teevan, Microsoft Research

Abstract:

Social media question asking, in which people use Internet technologies to solicit help from others, is an increasingly common way for people to find information. This workshop aims to bring together researchers studying social media question asking from a variety of perspectives, including social scientists seeking to describe the phenomenon and those seeking to create improved experiences through innovation in system building or user interface design. At the workshop, participants will review the current state of research in this area, and discuss issues relevant to the social media question asking research community, such as how to create public data sets, standardize metrics and measures, and handle privacy and ethical issues. Following the workshop we hope that participants will join us in sharing our enthusiasm for recent developments in social media question asking research with a broader audience through contributions to an edited volume or journal special issue on this topic.

Interested participants should submit a 2 - 4 page position paper in the SIGCHI Papers format. Submission can be submitted by email to smqaworkshop@microsoft.com by November 20, 2012. Authors will receive notification of acceptance or rejection by December 11th.

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/events/cscw2013smqaworkshop/

W8: Collaborative Information Seeking:Consolidating the Past, Creating the Future
Sun 24

Organizers:

Chirag Shah, Rutgers University
Preben Hansen, Swedish Inst. of CS
Rob Capra, UNC Chapel Hill

Abstract:

Information seeking is often not a solitary activity. The notion that people working in collaboration on information tasks should be studied and supported has become more prevalent in the recent years. The field of collaborative information seeking (CIS) is re-emerging, and bringing researchers and practitioners from various disciplines. This workshop will provide an opportunity to gather a motivated set of participants in learning and sharing their insights around theoretical foundations of CIS as well as its applications. The interactive nature of the workshop will allow the participants share their research, ideas, questions, and opinions with a goal of outlining an agenda for future research on collaborative information seeking, synthesis, and sense-making. The workshop will provide a venue to bring together those who have been working on CIS issues and those who want to plan their research agenda in this emerging field.

http://collab.infoseeking.org/events/cscw2013workshop

W9: Measuring Networked Social Privacy: Qualitative & Quantitative Approaches
Sun 24Sat 23

Organizers:

Xinru Page, University of California, Irvine
Karen Tang, University of California, Irvine
Fred Stutzman, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Airi Lampinen, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT & University of Helsinki

Abstract:

Social media plays an increasingly important role in interpersonal relationships and, consequently, raises privacy questions for end-users. However, there is little guidance or consensus for researchers on how to measure privacy in social media contexts. Privacy measurement has focused more on data protection and used scales such as CFIP and IUIPC that primarily emphasize informational privacy concerns and are less effective at capturing interpersonal and interactional privacy concerns. To facilitate cross-study comparisons, it is important to develop appropriate metrics and techniques for measuring privacy concerns in social media. Towards that goal, our 2-day workshop will cultivate a common understanding of current methods for measuring social privacy, as well as various existing interpersonal privacy frameworks. We will also give participants opportunities to create new privacy methods and techniques, which will be used as a step towards building a consensus on how to measure social privacy for networked, interpersonal settings.

Interested parties should submit a position paper (2-4 pages in the Extended Abstracts format) by November 16, 2012, 11:59PM Pacific Standard Time.

http://networkedprivacy2013.wordpress.com/

W10: CSCW and education: Viewing education as a site of work practice
Sat 23

Organizers:

Peter S. Wardrip, University of Pittsburgh
R. Benjamin Shapiro, Tufts University
Andrea Forte, Drexel University
Spiro Maroulis, Arizona State University
Karen Brennan, Harvard University
Ricarose Roque, MIT

Abstract:

Educational institutions, whether they are formal or informal, present a work environment in which technology, and social and cultural interactions mediate unfolding work. The interaction between CSCW and the work of education, including teaching, learning, and leading, can hold great potential for improving the educational institutions, providing challenging contexts to apply and develop CSCW theories about the work of groups. This workshop will explore themes at the intersection of CSCW theory and practice with the work practices that shape educational experiences. We invite researchers across disciplines as well as designers and practitioners to participate and share ideas related to the workshop theme. The goal of this workshop is to build a community interested in the intersection between CSCW and educational work practice. We invite participants to submit a 2-4 page position paper that aligns with the theme of this workshop.

http://cscw-ed.getdown.org/



Workshops Co-chairs
Jeremy Birnholtz, Northwestern University
Andy Crabtree, University of Nottingham